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Curated research library of TV news clips regarding the NSA, its oversight and privacy issues, 2009-2014

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Primary curation & research: Robin Chin, Internet Archive TV News Researcher; using TV News Archive service.

Speakers

Barton Gellman
Journalist, contributing to the Washington Post
KNTV 08/11/2013
Gregory: Has Edward Snowden won? Has he accomplished what he set out to do, which is not only get a debate going but force change in these programs? Gellman: he has accomplished far more than anyone in his position could have reasonably hoped to have accomplished. And He told me his greatest fear was that he would come out and do this and whole story would be -- you know, roiling around for a day and it would be gone. Now you have president Obama
Barton Gellman
Journalist, contributing to the Washington Post
KNTV 08/11/2013
Gellman continued: being forced to say that he welcomes the debate, which he welcomes sort of like the CEO who gets an angry letter yet writes back and says thank you for your interest in our surveillance programs. But it's top of the agenda now for two months.
Barton Gellman
Journalist, contributing to the Washington Post
KNTV 08/11/2013
Gellman: Well, Congress may decide not to allow the NSA or, via the FBI, to collect every single call record of every single American for this purpose. That's not what the president's argument sounded like in his news conference. He sounded like he wanted to, as you say, just put a little more oversight on it, internal, within the executive branch, and to sort of be slightly more transparent about how it happens. His justice department put out a long
Barton Gellman
Journalist, contributing to the Washington Post
KNTV 08/11/2013
Gellman continued: white paper defending exactly the way it works now. And honestly, they put a lot of, you know, good, smart minds to work on it, but i think sort of 9 out of 10 civil procedure professors would have given that less than an
Barton Gellman
Journalist, contributing to the Washington Post
KNTV 08/16/2013
Gellman: The Federal Surveillance Court that has jurisdiction over the NSA ordered it to destroy after five years all the call data records that it gathers on innocent Americans. And it did not do that. There were several thousand files. O'Donnell: the Agency said in a state to NBC News, when NSA makes a mistake in carrying out its foreign intelligence mission, the agency reports the issue internally and to federal overseers and aggressively gets to the bottom of it.
Barton Gellman
Washington Post Reporter
KNTV 08/16/2013
Gellman: The federal surveillance court that has jurisdiction over the NSA ordered it to destroy after five years all the call data records that it gathers on innocent Americans. And It did not do that. There were several thousand files. O'Donnell: the agency said in a statement to NBC News, when NSA makes a mistake in carrying out its foreign intelligence mission, the agency reports the issue internally and to federal over seers and aggressively gets to the bottom of it.
Barton Gellman
Journalist, contributing to the Washington Post
MSNBCW 08/30/2013
Mitchell: you've detailed that it's $52.6 billion, 69% goes to the NSA, CIA and the National Reconnaissance Center. How have you assessed from all that you have been reporting here the value we're getting, the bang for the buck? What are we doing well and not so well? Gellman: Well they have some fairly frank internal report cards here. They talk about where they think
Barton Gellman
Journalist, contributing to the Washington Post
MSNBCW 08/30/2013
Gellman continued: they've had successes and where they have critical gaps. Of course, the President and Congress are most concerned about the gaps to start with because there are things that they need to know to do their jobs and they don't know them. For example, there are five of those critical gaps with regard to the North Korean nuclear program, a subject of a great deal of concern to this government. There is no other country that has as many as five. There are others that have three or four. So the whole
Barton Gellman
Journalist, contributing to the Washington Post
MSNBCW 08/30/2013
Gellman continued: United States is, has a bunch of blind spots and that worries them. They've had big success in that area as well. For example, they have -- they've used very clever and creative and interesting technologies and operations to find out things they didn't know about North Korea and Iran. The Post has agreed to withhold a lot of those details and they should be withheld because you'd be alerting the other side to what's been found and you better go move it now.
Barton Gellman
Journalist, contributing to the Washington Post
MSNBCW 08/30/2013
Gellman: there is. Look, I mean, on the counter proliferation idea, on the worries about nuclear weapons, also biological and chemical, there is one section for Pakistan and one for all other threats. It is the gravest concern the U.S. intelligence agency -- that there is. They can't talk about that in public, they think, because the judgment of success of administrations has been. They need to take what they can get from Pakistan. If they cut off aid and
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